A String of Lies

Premiered April 27-30, 1995 at Performance Space 122, NYC
Performed by: Newt Gingrich, Scott Heron, Ishmael Houston-JonesAnne Iobst, Audrey KindredJennifer MillerJennifer Monson, Cathy Weis

 

Performers: K.J. Holmes, Ishmael Houston-Jones<br>Photo: Anja Hitzenberger Performers: K.J. Holmes, Ishmael Houston-Jones<br>Screen Capture: Weis Performers: Daniel Lepkoff, Cathy Weis<br>Photo: Anja Hitzenberger Performers: Jennifer Monson, Weis<br>Photo: Anja Hitzenberger Performer: Jennifer Monson<br>Photo: Anja Hitzenberger Performer: Jennifer Monson<br>Photo: Anja Hitzenberger Performer: Anne Iobst<br>Photo: Dona Ann McAdams Performer: Anne Iobst<br>Photo: Dona Ann McAdams Performer: Anne Iobst<br>Photo: Dona Ann McAdams Performer: Jennifer Monson<br>Photo: Dona Ann McAdams Performer: Anne Iobst <br>Photo: Dona Ann McAdams Performers: Jennifer Monson, Weis<br>Photo: Dona Ann McAdams Performers: Jennifer Monson, Weis<br>Photo: Dona Ann McAdams Performers: Scott Heron, Audrey Kindred </br>Photo: Dona Ann McAdams  Performers: Ishmael Houston-Jones, Jennifer Monson, Anne Iobst </br>Photo: Dona Ann McAdams Performer: Ishmael Houston-Jones </br>Photo: Dona Ann McAdams

Weis’ first New York solo show, A String of Lies, is a series of vignettes featuring partnerships between technology and the human body in performance. In the opening section, later performed under the title Politicians, Weis and Annie Iobst stand in front of a live camera, their faces on a large tv screen. Mixed with prerecorded images – featuring Newt Gingrich – identities become blurred in a swirl of change and continuous transformation.

Following Politicians, Weis and Jennifer Miller perform the duet Half & Half. Ishmael Houston-Jones and Scott Heron take turns with solos. Projected onto a huge screen behind the live dancers, the images overlap, distorting both perspective and form.

In the last duet with Jennifer Monson, Weis holds a live video camera. The two performers share weight and tumble together with ease. The resulting projected image from Weis’s camera, combined with loud music, is a surprisingly violent impression of the otherwise nonviolent dancing.


Performer: Jennifer Miller


Animation: Liaizon Wakest

 

Performance history:

Dia Center for the Arts, NYC (1994 – precursor)
Movement Research at Judson Church, NYC (1994 – precursor)
P.S. 122, NYC (1995 – premiere)
City Arts – television broadcast (1995)